• Facebook Social Icon

Napoleanic Era 1799-1815

Victorian Era 1837-1901

{

ROBINSON & McKEWAN

1870-1890

Burges Washstand 1879

Arts and Crafts Movement 1880

Jack the Ripper 1888

Mrs. Beeton 1861

1800

1810

1820

1830

1840

1850

1860

1870

1880

1890

1900

1910

1920

1930

1940

1950

1960

1970

1980

1990

2000

Salisbury The Poulty Cross 1870

1885

Karl Benz introduces the automobile

1840-1870

The Second Industrial Revolution:

took a rural agricultural England to an urban industrialized world power.

The agricultural revolution meant more food could sustain more people; the population doubled (from 1851 to 1901),

which freed people from the land to work in cities, and consume more products, which machinery made possible (sewing machines, steam engines, electric light) and the rivers helped distribute goods.

FROM COTTAGE TO FACTORY

The cotton industry played a central role in the Industrial Revolution. By 1870 steam power ran the textile factories that produced the fabric in quantity, from durable corduroy to fine sheer gauze. Horrible conditions were comman in the factories

1879 first version of the light bulb invented by Thomas Edison 

1850 Koh-i-Noor given to Queen Victoria

1937

The Hindenburg catches fire.

Etiquette for the Ball Room (1880)

 

[Added by George P. Landow, Professor of English and Art History, Brown University]

 

 

[Victorian Web Home —> Political History —> Social History]

 

A lady or gentleman should finish their toilet before entering the room for dancing, as it is indecorous in either to be drawing on their gloves, or brushing their hair. Finish your toilet in the dressing rooms.

 

Always recognize the lady or gentleman, or the director of ceremonies with becoming politeness: a salute or bow is sufficient.

 

A lady should always have an easy, becoming and graceful movement while engaged in a quadrille or promenade. It is more pleasing to the gentleman.

 

A lady should never engage herself for more than the following set, unless by the consent of the gentleman who accompanies her. It is very impolite and insulting in either lady or gentleman while dancing in quadrille, to mar the pleasure of others by galloping around or inside the next set.

 

If a gentleman, without proper introduction, should ask a lady with whom he is not acquainted to dance or promenade, the lady should positively refuse.

 

Recollect, the desire of imparting pleasure, especially to the ladies, is one of the essential qualifications of a gentleman.

 

Ladies should not be too hasty in filling their program on their entrance to the ball room, as they may have cause for regret should a friend happen to enter.

 

An introduction in a public ball room must be understood by the gentleman to be for that evening only, after which the acquaintanceship ceases, unless the lady chooses to recognize it at any further time or place.

 

A lady should not attend a public ball without an escort, nor should she promenade the ball room alone; in fact, no lady should be left unattended.

 

References

 

Carpenter, Lucien O. Universal Dancing Master. London: 1880.

This site was designed with the
.com
website builder. Create your website today.
Start Now